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13 February 2009
Manila, Philippines

The ADB study will carry out an analysis of the link between out–of–pocket medical spending and maternal, newborn and child health
The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is to carry out a new study into how private spending on maternal, newborn and child healthcare is hurting the poor in the Asia and the Pacific region.

The ADB study will carry out an analysis of the link between out–of–pocket medical spending and maternal, newborn and child health.

It will initially cover a wide range of countries in the Asia and Pacific region and then, based on the availability and quality of data, focus in on a smaller, yet to be decided, group of countries.

The study aims to answer key questions such as how many households are making healthcare payments that reach or exceed 40 per cent of their total household spending capacity in a year, and what would it cost governments to prevent households from being pushed into extreme poverty by health spending.

The study is funded by an ADB technical assistance grant of US $300,000 with cofinancing of US $326,000 from the Australian government through its Agency for International Development (AusAID).

The ADB study will build on the findings of previous research and provide clear policy direction for government action, the ADB release said.

“Better data and insights would help developing member countries and their development partners to identify the scale and intensity of the problem, possible policy responses and the likely budgetary implications for improving equity and access to essential health care for poor women and their children,” ADB’s Regional and Sustainable Development Department Advisor Ian Anderson said.

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