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Times of India
18 July 2011

At the age of 78, it is the beginning of a second inningsfor NNMehra.
A resident of Mumbai, Mehra was on Sunday declared the oldest recipient of a living donor liver transplant who is now leading a normal life. He underwent a successful liver transplant after his daughter donated a portion of her liver.

"In today’s fast changing world age remains no criteria for getting a liver transplant done. We have done successful liver transplants on 240 patients at New Delhi’s Medanta Hospitalin thelastone year on patients of three months of age to 78 years," Dr A Soin, chairman , Institute of Liver Transplant and Regenerative Medicine, Medanta Hospital, said.

He said Mehra has proved that age has no bearing on the outcomeof any surgery if one is medically fit. "Wehave more than 70 senior citizens who haveundergonesuccessfulliver transplants and are leading normal lives. I wish all grandparents the best of health and many more years of healthy life," hesaid.Another caseof J RVerma, a Delhi residentwho underwent a second knee replacement surgery four months ago at the age of 91, provestheir point.

Verma is active and on his wayto recovery.Verma underwentkneesurgery atthe ageof 79 for thefirsttimein 1999. "He is leading as active a life as any young 91-year -old does," Dr Ashok Rajgopal, Chairman, Institute of Bone andJointReplacement,said.

Rajgopal added, "While thecommon belief isthat artificial knee replacement surgery should not be done on the very young or the very old and that it has a limited life span, the truth is quite the opposite. Age really has no bearing on theoutcomeof thissurgery."

Doctors alsocitedthecases of Roop Singh(82),whounderwent a successful graft replacement for a leaking aortic aneurysm, 72-year-old Birender Nihal Singh and Ravinder Singh (68) who were successfully operated on for cardiac bypasssurgery.

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