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Over–the–counter water–based lubricants, such as K–Y jelly, can help with vaginal dryness. Do not use petroleum–based lubricants such as Vaseline. They weaken the latex in condoms and can cause vaginal infections. Vitamin E or moisturizers such as Replens can also help if used regularly. If lubricants and moisturizers are not sufficient, hormone replacement therapy can be used to help keep the vaginal walls plump and lubricated.

However, estrogen has many potential side effects. Using it in the form of a cream rather than a pill can reduce the side effects somewhat. One or two percent testosterone cream is another option, but it also has side effects. These creams should not be used as lubricants just before intercourse because your partner is likely to absorb the hormone too. Many women have fewer and less intense orgasms when they reach menopause. It may take more time and stimulation to become aroused. For some women these changes are distressing, while others enjoy them. For all women, having intercourse or masturbating regularly can help increase sexual responsiveness and pleasure. They keep the muscles supporting the uterus, vagina and bladder in shape and increase lubrication. Kegel exercises, contractions of the pelvic muscle near the vagina, can also help strengthen the vaginal muscles. Loss of interest in sex, temporary or long–term, occurs in some women during and after menopause. Some women do not find this a problem, especially if other aspects of life have become more important. But if it is bothering you, there are many possible causes to consider. These can include fatigue, stress, illness, relationship or psychological issues, and medication side effects, as well as hormonal changes and discomfort from the physical changes of menopause.

Relationship problems tend to be the cause of decreased sexual desire only when there have been ongoing difficulties in the relationship. These difficulties may be exacerbated by changes at menopause. If this is the case, consider seeing a therapist who specializes in sexuality. If the problem is hormonal, estrogen may help. However, its effect is generally on the physical changes, such as vaginal dryness and thinning. No direct relationship has yet been found between estrogen levels and desire to have sex.

Menopause, has and is experienced by all women. They experience a lot of changes, both physically and emotionally. The key to deal with this state is, be patient with yourself and those around you. Support of family members and loved one’s is a must, and try and read as much in about Menopause as you can, knowledge and truth can really put your mind at rest.
Gynaecologist and Obstetrician   Sexologist   Women's Health